Trojan Horse: World Turned Upside Down

WTUD

Trojan Horse song writing sessions must go something like this:

 “I’ve got this riff. It’s sixteen bars long” *plays riff* “What ya reckon?”

“Like it, but I got bored eight bars in. Can I insert this synth line after eight?” *plays synth*

“Yeah. What if we do that for four as, sorry, I got a bit bored halfway through, and then do some A Cappella stuff for eight?”

“Cool. And then change from 9/8 to 6/4…”

“…Midway through the A Cappella?”

“Yeah”

“Let’s stick load of weird noises over it. And a few flams?”

“Yeah”

[Band stops rehearsing to discuss what it is to live “under the foul austerity policies of an unwanted government.”]

This much is the joy of imagining how Trojan Horse make their tunes.

Opener ‘Jurapsyche Park’ is juggernaut full of Trojan goodies – heavy riffage, Jon Lord-esque keys and thumping drums. ‘Sesame’ is partly Cookie Monster gargling in a souk, and partly reminiscent of something from Cornelius’ Fantasma. The album’s title track is where we hear the self-proclaimed passion for Tears for Fears most strongly (and weirdly), delivering a chorus (inasmuch that the Horse do choruses) that sticks to the lips and should come with a #nowwhistling hashtag.  ‘Hypocrite’s Hymn’ is a real stand-out, delivering a brilliant piece of menace, claustrophobic atmospherics and a dub sensibility achieved more pleasingly than the more obvious attempt on live favourite ‘Scuttle’: this is the Horse proving that their (even) more experimental side is finely tuned. In fact, more is needed in this direction.

Never a band to be labelled short of ideas, the album is littered with interesting out-takes, snippets and re-workings, such as the two different versions of ‘Fire! Fire!’ – one as ‘Interlude’ and then a re-imagining of the single to the close the album. Elsewhere, moments of tenderness (although with a readiness to bite your heels) are present, particularly on the excellent mournful ‘Death and the Mad Queen’ (which wouldn’t be out of place on a Cope recording).

Many years in the making, World Turned Upside Down is so much more rounded than its predecessor and represents the Horse in confident, sometimes brash but always brilliant, mood. There’s no need to for gushing hyperbole when something is this genuinely good. Put simply, they’ve absolutely nailed it.

On ‘Sesame’ they sing “And I can see this going nowhere.” If there’s any justice they’re totally wrong. Be part of the movement for justice here.

Jurapsyche Park:

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About angrybonbon

Both Bars On's Manchester correspondent

Posted on October 8, 2014, in Album reviews and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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